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Rama-Seeta With Hanuman And The Brothers Of Rama
A resplendent Rama-durbar painting to add to the auspiciousness of your home. The Hindustani word ‘durbar’ translates to court; and indeed what a glamorous court of Lord Rama this is. The Lord and His wife, the sacredly beautiful Devi Seeta, are seated on a throne at the centre of the composition. It is upholstered in red velvet and gilt with gold to convey the cosmic glamour of the Vishnu and Lakshmi avataras (incarnations; Rama-Seeta are considered the ihalokiya incarnations of Vishnu-Lakshmi).The brothers of Rama surround the divine couple. The throne is flanked by Bharata and Shatrughna, sons of Queen Sumitra and Queen Kaikeyi, while Lakshmana, son of Queen Sumitra, kneels on the floor before them (these are the co-wives of Queen Kaushalya, mother of Rama). On the other side of the throne prostrates the great Lord Hanuman, celebrated for His unconditional love and devotion for Rama. While Hanuman makes an offering of a lotus to the Lord and Lakshmana joins His hands in the namaskaram mudra, Bharata and Shtraughna look lovingly over their brother and sister-in-law.The dense adornment of the figures and the crowns on each of their heads have been executed in skilful gilding. These thin gold leaf embellishments are a characteristic of classical South Indian art. More of this, that also in luxuriant proportions, are to be found along all four edges of the work, especially the upper edge made to resemble the architecture of a temple entrance.
Rama-Seeta With Hanuman And The Brothers Of Rama
A resplendent Rama-durbar painting to add to the auspiciousness of your home. The Hindustani word ‘durbar’ translates to court; and indeed what a glamorous court of Lord Rama this is. The Lord and His wife, the sacredly beautiful Devi Seeta, are seated on a throne at the centre of the composition. It is upholstered in red velvet and gilt with gold to convey the cosmic glamour of the Vishnu and Lakshmi avataras (incarnations; Rama-Seeta are considered the ihalokiya incarnations of Vishnu-Lakshmi).The brothers of Rama surround the divine couple. The throne is flanked by Bharata and Shatrughna, sons of Queen Sumitra and Queen Kaikeyi, while Lakshmana, son of Queen Sumitra, kneels on the floor before them (these are the co-wives of Queen Kaushalya, mother of Rama). On the other side of the throne prostrates the great Lord Hanuman, celebrated for His unconditional love and devotion for Rama. While Hanuman makes an offering of a lotus to the Lord and Lakshmana joins His hands in the namaskaram mudra, Bharata and Shtraughna look lovingly over their brother and sister-in-law.The dense adornment of the figures and the crowns on each of their heads have been executed in skilful gilding. These thin gold leaf embellishments are a characteristic of classical South Indian art. More of this, that also in luxuriant proportions, are to be found along all four edges of the work, especially the upper edge made to resemble the architecture of a temple entrance.
The Incomparable Tanjore Nataraja
Tanjore Nataraja refers to the iconography of Lord Shiva as found in the Brhadeshvara Temple of Tanjore (Thanjavur), Tamil Nadu. Having been built during the Chola dynasty rule, it houses an overpowering Nataraja murti fashioned sometime in the 11th century. The Nataraja that you see on this page is a contemporary reproduction of the incomparable Tanjore Nataraja.Sculpted from brass, the dancing figure is mounted on a plinth that is almost one-third the height of the murti. On the back of the avidya-roopi Apasmara (the grotesque personification of ignorance) dances the king (‘raja’) of the performing arts (‘nata’), the resplendent Nataraja. His all-powerful tandava has the power to annihilate everything (flames, in the left posterior hand) and give birth anew (damroo, in the right posterior). His locks are flaying about His head from the momentum of His tandava. A crown the shape of a multihooded snake sits on His head. The predominance of snakes - from in His hair to wound around His limbs and waist and neck - is a signature element of the Nataraja iconography.A perfectly circular aureole frames the slender figure engaged in tandava. With the openwork and the ring of flames emanating from the outer edge, its style is very much in keeping with the Brhadeshvara idiom.
The Incomparable Tanjore Nataraja
Tanjore Nataraja refers to the iconography of Lord Shiva as found in the Brhadeshvara Temple of Tanjore (Thanjavur), Tamil Nadu. Having been built during the Chola dynasty rule, it houses an overpowering Nataraja murti fashioned sometime in the 11th century. The Nataraja that you see on this page is a contemporary reproduction of the incomparable Tanjore Nataraja.Sculpted from brass, the dancing figure is mounted on a plinth that is almost one-third the height of the murti. On the back of the avidya-roopi Apasmara (the grotesque personification of ignorance) dances the king (‘raja’) of the performing arts (‘nata’), the resplendent Nataraja. His all-powerful tandava has the power to annihilate everything (flames, in the left posterior hand) and give birth anew (damroo, in the right posterior). His locks are flaying about His head from the momentum of His tandava. A crown the shape of a multihooded snake sits on His head. The predominance of snakes - from in His hair to wound around His limbs and waist and neck - is a signature element of the Nataraja iconography.A perfectly circular aureole frames the slender figure engaged in tandava. With the openwork and the ring of flames emanating from the outer edge, its style is very much in keeping with the Brhadeshvara idiom.

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